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Stars Detect The Straight Line Pattern Of The Radii Of A Circle. Spitzer Space Telescope CG Protesters NGC 2264: NASA has published a photograph taken by its Spitzer space telescope that shows several newborn stars or prototypes in NGC 2264.

NGC 2264 is about 2,600 light years away in the constellation Monoceros.

This astronomical object includes the so-called groups of Christmas trees, groups of snowflakes, cones and fox fur nebulas. Spitzer’s infrared image reveals newborn stars hidden behind a thick dust in NGC 2264.

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Astronomer Spitzer stated

Since the stars detect the straight line pattern of the radii of a circle, we believe that these are protostars. With only 100,000 years of age.

These structures for babies have not yet” dragged “from their place of birth. Over time, the natural movement of each star will break this sequence, and the design of the snowflakes will no longer exist.

While most of the stars that give the group of Christmas trees their name and triangular shape do not shine in Spitzer’s infrared eyes, all the stars formed by this cloud of dust are considered part of the group.

He explained. Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing at groups of newborns. Spitzer also alternately illuminates the dark, dense nebula of the cone, whose tip can be seen towards the lower left corner of the image.

Spitzer Space Telescope Stains Protosters 2,600 light years away! Star-forming clouds are dynamic and evolving structures. When they give birth to newborn stars.

An incredible amount of dust is expelled in the process, through which the newborn stars appear as a touch of light.

Recently, NASA’s Spitzer space telescope hooked several rising stars or prototypes surrounded by dense clouds of dust on NGC 2264, located 2,600 light years away in the constellation Monoceros.

According to NASA, the infrared astronomical image shows baby stars as pink and red spots that move towards the center, which are formed with regular spherical intervals, similar to the pattern of a wheel or a snowflake.

Therefore, astronomers have called it a "group of snowflakes."

At only 100,000 years old, these baby structures have not yet been “tracked” from their place of birth. Over time, the natural drifting movement of each star will break this sequence, and the design of the snowflakes will not be too much.

Although most of the stars that give their name to the so-called cluster of Christmas trees and the triangular shape do not shine in Spitzer’s infrared eyes, all the stars formed by this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster. NASA reported:

Like the dusty cosmic finger pointing to groups of newborns, Spitzer also alternately illuminates the dark and dense cone nebula, whose tip can be seen towards the lower left corner of the image.

This impressive photograph is perhaps one of the last observations made by the NASA telescope. Spitzer has mapped the Milky Way, and has also taken beautiful images of nebulae and seen incredible things.

And such as a new ring around Saturn and the exoplanet. Congratulations to Spitzer, who is approaching his incredible journey as the James Webb space telescope in 2020.

CG demonstrators of the Spitzer Space Telescope NGC 2264: NASA has published a photo taken by its Spitzer Space Telescope that shows several stars or prototypes newborn in NGC 2264.

NGC 2264 is about 2,600 light years away in the constellation Monoceros. This astronomical object includes the so-called groups of Christmas trees, snowflakes, cones and groups of fox fur nebulas.

Spitzer’s infrared image shows newborn stars hidden behind a thick dust in NGC 2264. Astronomer Spitzer said: Since the stars detect the pattern of a straight line of a circle’s radius.

We believe they are protostars.

‘For babies with only 100,000 years of age, these structures have not yet been dragged’ from their place of birth. Over time, the natural circulation of each star will break this sequence.

The design of snowflakes already there will not be.. While most of the stars that name a group of Christmas trees and their triangular shape do not shine in Spitzer’s infrared eyes.

All stars formed by this cloud of dust are considered part of the group. He explained, Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing towards groups of newborns, Spitzer also alternately illuminates the dark and dense nebula of the cone.

Gaia (Mother Earth in Greek mythology) is part of the Horizon 2000 Plus long-term science program, an ESA pivotal space astro-mission, with a target> 3D space catalog> 1 billion stars.

Or a compilation of approximately one 1% stars. In our home galaxy, the Milky Way. Gaia will monitor each of its target stars approximately 70 times the magnitude of G = 20 over a 5-year period.

This will accurately record changes in your position, distance, gait, and brightness.

It is expected to discover hundreds of thousands of new celestial objects, such as extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs, and observe hundreds of thousands of asteroids within our own solar system.

The mission will also study approximately 500,000 distant quasars and provide rigorous new evidence of Albert Einstein. Listing the night sky is an essential part of astronomy.

Before astronomers can examine an astronomical object, they must know where to find it. Without this knowledge, astronomers are rendered powerless over what Galileo once called dark laboratory mazes.

During the satellite’s expected five-year lifespan, Gaia will observe each star approximately 70 times, each time recording its brightness, color, and most importantly, its position.

The precise measurement of the position of an astronomical object is known as astronomy, and since humans began studying the sky, astronomers have devoted much of their time to this art.

However, Gaia will do so with extraordinary precision, beyond the dreams of those ancient astronomers. By comparing the series of precise observations of Gaia.

Astronomers today will soon be able to make precise measurements of the apparent motion of a star in the sky, allowing them to determine its distance and speed in space.

The resulting database will allow astronomers to trace the history of the Milky Way. While charting the sky, Gaia’s higher instruments are expected to study a host of previously unknown celestial objects.

As well as ordinary stars. Its expected path includes asteroids in our solar system, icy bodies in the outer solar system, failed stars, baby stars, planets around other stars, distant stellar explosions.

Black holes in the process of feeding, and supermassive black holes. Other galaxies.

Gaia’s goal is to provide a highly accurate dynamic 3D map of our galaxy using global astronomy from space, complemented by multi-colored photometric measurements from various epochs.

The goal is to complete a catalog of star magnitudes of up to 20, which corresponds to more than one billion stars, or about 1% of the stars in our galaxy.

The sensitivity of the instrument is such that a distance greater than 20-100 kilopores (kpc) will be covered, thus including the bulge of the galaxy (8.5 kpc) and the spiral arms.

The measurements will not be limited to the stars in the Milky Way. These include the study of the structure, dynamics and stellar populations of Magellanic clouds, space motions of galaxies.

And local clusters supernovae, galactic nuclei and quasars. Which are then used to materialize inertial frames for Gaia measurements. Gaia is ESA’s second space mission dedicated to astronomy. 

It builds on the legacy of the successful Hippocross Mission (1989-1993). 7) Like Hipparcos, Gaia’s observation strategy is based on detecting stellar positions in two fields of view separated by a ‘basic angle’, which is 106.5º for Gaia.

This strategy allows astronomers to establish a coherent frame of reference across the sky, a by-product of high-precision measurements of stellar positions.

After a detailed study of concept and technology during 1998-2000, Gaia was selected in October 2000 as a confirmation mission within ESA’s science program.

This was confirmed by ESA’s Science Program Committee after reevaluation of the science program in June 2002, and reconfigured in November 2003 after another reevaluation of the program.

The project entered Phase B2 / C / D in February 2006. As of summer 2012, Gaia is in Phase-D (qualification and production) and will be launched in another.

In June 2013, ESA’s Arab-Star Surveyor, Gaia, completed final preparations in Europe and is scheduled to depart for its launch site in French Guiana.

On August 23, 2013, the Gaia spacecraft boarded the Antonov 124 aircraft and arrived at Cayenne in French Guiana. On October 23, 2013, ESA postponed the launch of the Gaia mission.

This decision was made due to a technical problem that has already been identified on another orbiting satellite. This problem concerns the components used on Gaia in two transponders that generate “time signals” for downlink scientific telemetry.

To avoid potential problems, they will be replaced. The transponders were removed from Gaia in Kaurau and returned to Europe, where potentially faulty components were replaced and verified.

After the replacement is made, the transponder will be refined to Gaia and a final verification test will be performed. As a result of these precautionary measures.

It will not be possible to launch Gia within a window that includes a pre-scheduled release date of November 20. The next available release window is December 17 – January 5, 2014. 11

The precise measurement of the position of an astronomical object is known as astronomy, and since humans began studying the sky, astronomers have devoted much of their time to this art.

However, Gaia will do so with extraordinary precision, beyond the dreams of those ancient astronomers (Ref. 21).

By comparing the series of precise observations of Gaia, astronomers today will soon be able to make precise measurements of the apparent motion of a star in the sky, allowing them to determine its distance and speed in space.

The resulting database will allow astronomers to trace the history of the Milky Way. While charting the sky, Gaia’s higher instruments are expected to study a host of previously unknown celestial objects.

As well as ordinary stars. Its expected path includes asteroids in our solar system, icy bodies in the outer solar system, failed stars, baby stars, planets around other stars, distant stellar explosions.

Black holes in the process of feeding, and supermassive black holes. Other galaxies. Gaia will be a search engine. To fully understand the physics of a star, one must know its distance from Earth.

This is more difficult than it sounds because the stars are so remote. Even the closest is 40 trillion kilometers away, and we can’t measure the pace of the spacecraft as it goes.

We also cannot bounce off radar signals, a method used to measure distances within the solar system. Instead, astronomers have developed other techniques to measure and estimate distances.

The most reliable and direct way to measure the distance of a star is to determine its ‘parallax’. By obtaining extremely precise measurements of the position of the stars, Gaia will produce parallax for a billion stars.

More than 99% of these have never correctly measured their distance. Gaia will also make precise measurements of other important stellar parameters.

Including brightness, temperature, composition, and mass. The observations will evolve into many different types of stars and many different phases.

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