Crocodiles Have The Ability To Reposition Their Tails

Crocodiles Have The Ability To Reposition Their Tails By Up To 18% Of Their Total Body Length. Young American crocodiles can show their tails.

The study revealed. According to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, young American alligators (Alligator mississipensis) have the ability to reposition their tails by up to 18% of their total body length.

The study authors hope their findings will help uncover new therapeutic approaches to repair injuries and treat diseases such as arthritis. Xu et al.

An archaeologist, presents the first physical and histological evidence of the repair of the tail with regrowth in the American crocodile (Alligator mississipensis).

The regrown crocodile’s tail is approximately 6 to 18% of the total body length and was morphologically distinct from the original tail segment.

A researcher at the College of Life Sciences in Arizona, author Dr. Cindy Xu said.

The American aggregator, in addition to its size, is interesting because the re-growing tail shows signs of regeneration and wound healing within of the same structure.

State University. With regard to cartilage, blood vessels, nerves and scales, they were consistent with previous lizard tail regeneration studies from our lab and others.

However, we were surprised to discover scar-shaped connective tissue rather than skeletal muscle in the regrown crocodile tail.

Future comparative studies will be important to understand why regenerative capacity is variable between different groups of reptiles and animals.

Dr. Xu and her colleagues used advanced imaging techniques combined with methods for studying the anatomy and organization of tissues to examine the structure of the agromy crocodile tails.

They discovered that the new tails were complex structures with a central skeleton surrounded by connective tissue that interconnected with blood vessels and nerves.

“The spectrum of regenerative potential between species is attractive, clearly a high cost to produce new muscle,” said co-author, Dr. from the Arizona State University College of Life Sciences. Jean Wilson-Rawls said.

The regenerated crocodile’s tail differs from the original tail. The regrown scales are densely arranged and lack dorsal scutes (top right).

An unselected tube of cartilage (yellow) replaces the bone (tan) in the growing tail; Also, the re-grown tail lacks skeletal muscle (red) and instead has a large amount of fibrous connective tissue (pink).

Crocodiles, lizards, and humans belong to a group of animals that have amniotes in the spinal cord.

While the team first studied the ability of lizards to revive their tails, the new discovery of the complex regrowth of the tail in crocodiles revealed more about the process in amniotes.

Alligators and the ancestors of dinosaurs and birds diverged about 250 million years ago, said Professor Kenro Kusumi, co-lead author of the Arizona State University School of Life Sciences.

Our discovery has found that crocodiles maintain cellular machines to maintain complex tails, while birds have lost that ability when it was lost during development.

Are there fossils of dinosaurs, in whose offspring modern birds were born, including tales of regron? So far, we have not found any evidence for this in the published literature. Co-author Professor Rebecca Fisher said:

If we understand that different animals are capable of repairing and regenerating tissues, then this knowledge can be harnessed to develop medical treatments.

Researcher at the Arizona State University School of Life Sciences and the Department of Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Arizona School of Medicine at Phoenix.

Young crocodiles can find their tails again, scientists discover.

Researchers in the United States have found that, like lizards, young crocodiles also have the ability to reposition their tails by about 23 centimeters, or 18 percent of their total body length.

Scientists from Arizona State University (ASU) and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries used advanced imaging techniques and tissue samples to examine the anatomy of American alligators.

And particularly the structure of their regenerated tails.

The team discovered that these new tails had a central skeleton made of cartilage and surrounded by connective tissues interconnected with blood vessels and nerves.

Their research suggests that the regrown tails give alligators a functional advantage in their swampy settlements. Cindy Xu, a PhD graduate from ASU’s Cellular and Molecular Biology Program and lead author of the paper, said:

What makes the crocodile interesting, in addition to its size, is that the regrowing tail shows signs of regeneration. and wound healing.

Corresponding to previous studies of lizard tail regeneration from our laboratory and others in relation to cartilage, blood vessels, nerves and scales.

However, we used to look for connective tissue like scars rather than skeletal muscle in the regenerated crocodile tails. We were surprised.

She added that “future comparative studies will be important to understand why regenerative capacity is variable between different groups of reptiles and animals.”

Crocodiles, lizards, and humans have one thing in common: they all belong to a group of animals that have a column called amniotes. Scientists say this new research has given them even more information about amniotes.

And following previous discoveries that lizards can also find their tails again. Rebecca Fisher, co-author and professor at the University of Arizona School of Medicine at Phoenix and ASU College, said:

If we understand that different animals are capable of repairing and regenerating tissue, then this knowledge can help improve medical treatments. It can be taken to develop.

The researchers hope their findings will lead to a more scientific exploration and lead to the discovery of new therapeutic approaches to repair injuries and treat diseases such as arthritis.

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